Your coworker is married. What about your friend?

Interracial dating is an increasingly common pursuit, and couples — both straight and gay — are changing the face of the modern dating landscape. There are many new ways for people to meet in…

Your coworker is married. What about your friend?

Interracial dating is an increasingly common pursuit, and couples — both straight and gay — are changing the face of the modern dating landscape. There are many new ways for people to meet in the digital age. Open Facebook groups like Meetup.com are a welcome option for a rather unorthodox way to meet someone. But there’s another model that has been around for centuries. In fact, it’s one that hasn’t changed in all that long. In the 18th century, British aristocrats were courted and married by members of the other sex.

Patrons of the bar are known to have had illicit trysts with prospective mates from the opposite sex, but it wasn’t so long ago that the tradition of arranging an affair with a member of the opposite sex of the opposite sex during a romantic tryst was part of the norm. But after the passage of the 15th Amendment in 1868, the institution of courting in America continued to deteriorate. It became a mere excuse for men to cheat on their spouses, which, sadly, was commonplace in the country. You can only see what’s public, after all.

In contrast, elsewhere around the world, courtship practices remain unchanged. People still choose to marry someone of the opposite sex, and coupledom is still a cultural norm in many countries. The practice lives on in all kinds of archaic ways, from the way in which mates are selected to the way in which false stories are spun as cover. But what about those who believe they should hide their true selves from potential mates when dating? Do they try to keep their true selves buried deep so as not to taint their new relationships?

We surveyed a sample of more than 100 heterosexual individuals to find out how society’s attitude towards interracial dating has evolved over the years. As a result, our survey appears to reveal a deep anxiety, especially among men, with regard to changing relationships. While most men are relatively comfortable and confident about interracial relationships, when we asked respondents which respondents they most didn’t want to date, men overwhelmingly ranked, in order, a black woman, a woman of Asian descent, a non-white woman and a white woman. That was certainly true of the male respondents, as well as women.

Overall, we found that many men are ambivalent about interracial dating.

It is true that most men — 72 percent — appear willing to date a white woman or Asian woman. They are not willing to date an Indian woman or a black woman. Because they do not date at all, the Latino, African American, Asian and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander respondent pools in our survey showed a very low response rate, with less than 1 percent of any given racial group responding. But beyond these demographic groups, they shared much of the same trends as the white respondents.

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