Ex-congresswoman calls for government vaccination waiver to be canceled

In the wake of the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, affected Americans may be more inclined to shop for vaccines against the most common, and potentially contagious, types of diseases. But Representative Marjorie Taylor…

Ex-congresswoman calls for government vaccination waiver to be canceled

In the wake of the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, affected Americans may be more inclined to shop for vaccines against the most common, and potentially contagious, types of diseases. But Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-WV) isn’t one of them.

The former congresswoman argued recently that the line between private and public vaccination required by the government is a “violation of medical ethics,” according to CNN.

“I have the absolute, unequivocal approval of the chair of the CDC, the director of the CDC, to not have that government vaccination program in place,” she claimed, reported ABC News. “Because this is not about protecting the children in America, it’s about protecting Big Pharma.”

The government vaccine waiver was abandoned in the late 1980s, and was replaced by the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. But Greene argues that parents were informed about the changes, and that the waivers made it more difficult for those who have chosen to decline vaccination. She suggested that parents opting not to vaccinate must be educated about their medical needs as well.

Vaccines have been known to prevent the measles, mumps, and rubella, or Mumps and Rubella, or MMR, virus, which is currently in epidemic proportions in the United States. The virus, which was discovered by Dr. Martin Polivka’s biotechnology lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the 1960s, has since been identified by the World Health Organization as one of the top causes of both cause and chronic disease in the world. But it is not the only one, according to WHO. Other communicable diseases such as diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, mumps, and measles are common worldwide.

According to CDC guidance, requesting a waiver doesn’t necessarily mean a person doesn’t have a right to a vaccine. Some vaccine exemptions are based on medical reasons, but if those medical reasons are not met, the state can grant a vaccination waiver, CDC guidance states. Once parents request exemptions for religious or personal reasons, and the exemption is granted, it is considered a policy decision, not personal preference. The risk of getting the disease was deemed not medically critical, and those who opted not to take the preventative action were reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses of vaccine.

Still, Greene’s assertion that the exemption puts non-vaccination on par with childhood diabetes does not sit well with Democratic politicians, like Representative Christina Famosan.

“Only Texas has ever paid reimbursement for a vaccine exemption, but no one takes diabetes like we do measles,” Famosan commented, according to The Washington Post. “So, even with a state that offers reimbursements for an exemption for immunizations, it’s still an option for parents. We just don’t have any money to pay for it.”

Read the full story at CNN.

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