Daniel Lee, PPR-owned Bottega Veneta’s creative director, has resigned, sources say

Daniel Lee, chief creative officer of Bottega Veneta, is leaving the Italian fashion house, according to WWD. The brand did not make an announcement, but insiders told WWD that Lee had submitted his resignation…

Daniel Lee, PPR-owned Bottega Veneta’s creative director, has resigned, sources say

Daniel Lee, chief creative officer of Bottega Veneta, is leaving the Italian fashion house, according to WWD.

The brand did not make an announcement, but insiders told WWD that Lee had submitted his resignation last month.

Lee’s departure follows a rocky few years at the brand, which is owned by PPR, the French conglomerate that owns the likes of Gucci, Yves Saint Laurent and Balenciaga.

His tenure had begun with a splashy display of Nicolas Ghesquière’s 10th anniversary collection. He also tapped singer Lorde as the face of the brand. But he was swiftly replaced at the helm by Delfina Delettrez Fendi, who had previously worked at Paris couture house Givenchy.

Delettrez continued to be recharged by recent appointments including the design team of Attilio Cappellini and Stefano Pilati, a pair of former men’s wear designers at the Cerruti group, and Lili Vitoria, a former Juicy Couture design director. But despite the changes, the women’s collections were nevertheless heavily favored by critics, especially for their easy takes on boho chic. The Spring 2019 collection, which included tanks printed with the owner’s custom name and zipper-embellished bucket bags, fell just short of earning an A rating from The Cut and was feted by the New York Times as a breakout hit.

But in a time when apparel labels that run straight and airy to achieve a warm glow have moved to align themselves with Coachella, instead of the runway, Lee’s aesthetic was rarely shunned by critics or customer, and it had been praised as a breath of fresh air when he first started.

But perhaps the most striking aspect of his tenure was his ability to maintain youthful appeal without sacrificing the heritage of the brand.

“It is by making the glamour of our past strong and turning it into something contemporary that we keep the beauty of our past alive,” he told WWD last September, referencing his aim to honor Bottega Veneta’s heritage while appealing to the millennial generation.

On its release of Lee’s tenure as creative director, Bottega Veneta described him as “a true inspiration for creative directors of many Italian, French and international brands” and “an enraptured object of desire for a young global world.”

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